Last Entry

May 26, 2009

OJT doesn’t officially end until Saturday, but allow me to sort-of summarize my experience now…

It wasn’t all roses, but it was fairly enjoyable, and I managed to learn stuff I probably would never encounter during classes at school, like XML parsing, JSP, and SVG. Plus, I’ve gained some more reasons for loving Eclipse during these two months — auto format, refactor, and ctrl+shift+o, which organizes imports. The best part, however is the free food, of course. Seems to me that us interns ate the most around the office.

–Leslie

The last week of OJT feels relaxed for now, and since we’re done with the actual program, it’s time to make the manuals and documentation. Now, our system is coded in Java, and Java programs will naturally have to have their Javadocs. Here at Azeus, we use Eclipse (like most of us do at school). All summer, my “love” for Eclipse has been nothing but increasing. One especially useful shortcut for documenting code is alt+shift+j, which generates Javadoc comments for the selected method/component. It lists all parameters and the “@return” code, all you have to do is fill in some information. Another handy shortcut is ctrl+shift+f, which automatically formats your code (doesn’t seem to work for .jsp files though, shame). All uber-long lines of code will be split and properly indented, making code stuff much less painful to read.

–Leslie

That Neverending Demo

May 25, 2009

This morning, when I got to the office, my fellow OJT-ers were sitting together gossiping. Normally, they would all be staring into their respective monitors, minding their own business. Well, more or less minding their own business, anyway. That should be some clue as to what I and most of my colleagues did today. We pretty much just loafed around and ate the free snacks.

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Almost done!

May 22, 2009

It’s the second to the last week of OJT, and we managed to come up with a working version of a web interface. Well, it seems to be working, but it’s not very efficient. The Decision Adviser’s interface allows for file uploads, and these uploads are placed in a database. Currently, the n00b code creates a new connection to the database every time it needs to retrieve something. I can only imagine the flood of errors if a handful of users repeatedly mash the F5 button while using the interface. Apparently, there’s a framework for creating database-oriented web apps called Spring, which allows for much cleaner code. I just hope that we can cram all that code tweaking in one week…

–Leslie

More Web Interfaces

May 17, 2009

 

What started as a very basic and very simple user interface for uploading a bunch of files has now been turned into a full-blown online file manager. We’ve been asked (aka required) to add a ton of new features to the Decision Adviser interface. Last time, I mentioned modal windows. By the end of the week, we have managed to add a “popup” form using SubModal, which is just some Javascript and CSS files to create the effect of a page within a page. 
In addition to a screen for uploading data, we also have to make a screen for listing all uploaded files and deleting said files. And previewing said files. And possibly renaming said files. And likely viewing the list sorted in different ways. And so on. All that and a lot more cleaning up needs to be finished this coming week, and I expect the next few days to be full of hair pulling and furious typing.

 

What started as a very basic and very simple user interface for uploading a bunch of files has now been turned into a full-blown online file manager. We’ve been asked (aka required) to add a ton of new features to the Decision Adviser interface. Last time, I mentioned modal windows. By the end of the week, we have managed to add a “popup” form using SubModal, which is just some Javascript and CSS files to create the effect of a page within a page. 

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I never expected to get sick once I stepped the office. But that is exactly what happened yesterday. And I always 
imagined that if my record were to become tainted, it would be because of my being late. However, that was not 
the case, and long story short, I managed to puke in the middle of Trinoma (they must think me drunk) before 
getting home after a half day at the office attempting to work. I think I spent more time concentrating on eating 
Sky Flakes and cup noodles.
Today was spent at home, recovering and researching ways to make modal windows, kind of like the ones here at 
WordPress when you try to attach stuff to your blog entry. At this point, I am still unsure whether or not we 
will be using the popups for the web app, but it’s good to know about them, seeing as they’re all over the web.

 

I never expected to get sick once I stepped the office. But that is exactly what happened yesterday. And I always imagined that if my record were to become tainted, it would be because of my being late. However, that was not the case, and long story short, I managed to puke in the middle of Trinoma (they must think me drunk) before getting home after a half day at the office attempting to work. I think I spent more time concentrating on eating Sky Flakes and cup noodles.

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Web Apps!

May 8, 2009

 

This week, I have been working on a web-based user interface for the Decision Adviser where the user can upload 
templates (and other files like images and css). After uploading files to use as templates, the user can assign 
which templates to use for each possible result from the Rule Engine to customize the result presentation.
Having only worked on a web app once (crammed project for CS165) and not enjoying it all that much, I must say 
that I had some fun with this week’s task. I used JSP and Javascript for the web pages, and Oracle for the 
database. Though installation and setup for JSP and Oracle have been relatively simple, I found JSP inferior to 
Ruby on Rails and its verifies_presence_of conditions. To actually transfer files from a remote computer, I used 
Apache Commons FileUpload (we’ve been using a whole lot of Apache products). All the file locations and mappings 
are then stored in the database.

 

This week, I have been working on a web-based user interface for the Decision Adviser where the user can upload templates (and other files like images and css). After uploading files to use as templates, the user can assign which templates to use for each possible result from the Rule Engine to customize the result presentation.

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Apparently, the Decision Adviser we’re working on is too easy. Our supervisor decided that we should add an interface for the user to upload new templates for displaying output. This new interface would be web-based, of course, and we were told that we would be using JavaServer Pages, better known as JSP. Our JSP crash course would begin on Monday…

–Leslie

As the deadline for the first iteration becomes ever closer, our group finds itself furiously coding, testing, and debugging our Decision Adviser. Detecting and changing variable names in Velocity files (basically text files, like any other code) has proven to be harder than I thought. Not quite as difficult as fully parsing some programming language, but close. I have to say that I do not like it, and I hope I won’t be making any compilers soon.
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Week 2, part 2

April 26, 2009

The revisions to the requirements continue all through this week, and it will probably continue into next week as we decide which features to keep in our Decision Adviser. Luckily (or not), the Decision Adviser isn’t that difficult a program to make, as it has been reduced to formalizing a template to display results.

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